Inri acupuncture needles used for Shonoshin therapy, Japan 1980-1985

Made:
1980-1985 in Japan

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Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Three large Inri needles, used in Shonoshin therapy, a non-invasive form of acupuncture developed for young children, from the surgery of a British practitioner c.1996, unsigned, Japanese, 1980-1985.

Inri needles are used for Shonoshin therapy. Shonoshin is non-invasive acupuncture for children. In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), acupuncture needles are normally inserted into certain points on the skin. This unblocks the flow through the body of a life force known as qi (chi). TCM practitioners believe qi is essential to wellbeing. However, Inri needles such as these are used within Shonosin. They are part of a range of ‘friendly’ equipment so children are not intimidated. The skin is scratched with brushes, combs and massage rollers during therapy to stimulate the acupuncture points. These steel rods have a heavy ball on the top. This presses the needle down without breaking the skin.

Details

Category:
Asian Medicine
Object Number:
2002-487
Materials:
complete and metal
Measurements:
Needle (each): 78 mm 13 mm, .026 kg
type:
acupuncture needle
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • tools & equipment
credit:
Kelley, R.