Trade card advertising 'Golden Eye-Water', England, 1780

Made:
1780 in England and City of London
printer:
Geoghegan
Trade card advertising 'Golden Eye-Water', England, 1780.

Buy this image as a print 

Buy

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

License

Buy this image as a print 

Buy

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

License

Trade card advertising 'Golden Eye-Water', England, 1780.
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Trade card: Townly, Nurseryman at Walworth, St Mary, Newington, Surrey, 1780. Advertises Golden Eye-Water for dropping into inflamed eyes. 6 3/4 inches x 5 1/8 inches. (Calv. 400)

‘Golden Eye Water’ is recommended for all illnesses of the eyes, including poor vision and inflammation. It could be used as an eye wash or dripped into the eye using a feather as a dropper. It was guaranteed to have a long life. One bottle cost 1 shilling and 6 pence, equivalent to about £5 today – although discounts were offered for bulk purchases. Townly, who made and sold this secret preparation, claimed it was only available through him. He was well placed in his job as a nurseryman, where he looked after trees and plants, to get hold of the raw materials that made up his concoction.

Details

Category:
Art
Object Number:
1951-687/33
type:
trade card
taxonomy:
  • visual and verbal communication
  • advertising card
credit:
Donated by Mr Thomas H. Court (Court Collection)