Votive intestine

Made:
200-200 in unknown place
Votive intestine, terracotta, probably Roman, 200BC-200AD

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Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

Buy

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

License

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

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License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

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Votive intestine, terracotta, probably Roman, 200BC-200AD
Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Votive intestine, terracotta, probably Roman, 200BC-200AD

It is believed that the representations of hands, feet, hearts, eyes, ears, penises, kidneys, uteri, intestines and many other anatomical parts were left as offerings in sanctuaries and temples to request help from or to thank the gods for the healing of the represented body part. Made of terracotta (fired clay), votive organs like this one were mass-produced from moulds and sold in the proximity of Ancient Roman sites of worship where they were either hung, displayed, or buried in sacred pits as part of a ritual. This votive organ may represent the intestines. It is possible to speculate that the person who left it at the temple had a digestive ailment.

Details

Category:
Classical & Medieval Medicine
Collection:
Sir Henry Wellcome's Museum Collection
Object Number:
A73044
Materials:
terracotta and complete
Measurements:
overall: 6 mm x 22 mm x 21 mm,
type:
votive viscera