Printout of the Daisyworld programme

Made:
1981
author:
James Ephraim Lovelock
James Lovelock Archive. Section of very long computer printout showing visual representation of Daisyworld through James Lovelock Archive. Section of very long computer printout showing visual representation of Daisyworld through Very long computer printout showing visual representation of Daisyworld through time Very long computer printout showing visual representation of Daisyworld through time

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James Lovelock Archive. Section of very long computer printout showing visual representation of Daisyworld through
Science Museum, London|James Lovelock
Science Museum, London|James Lovelock

James Lovelock Archive. Section of very long computer printout showing visual representation of Daisyworld through
Science Museum, London|James Lovelock
Science Museum, London|James Lovelock

Very long computer printout showing visual representation of Daisyworld through time
Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Very long computer printout showing visual representation of Daisyworld through time
Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Long computer printout showing visual representation of James Lovelock's 'Daisyworld' through time.

Lovelock’s most (in)famous work is the Gaia hypothesis, which proposes the Earth as an integrated self-regulating system that combines living and non-living things. Gaining popular attention from his publication Gaia: A New Look at Life on Earth in 1979, it appealed to environmental activists as showing a model of a ‘living Earth’. Daisyworld was the computer model of how Gaia could work on a simplified planet: black daisies (represented by #) absorb light, warming the planet, while white daisies (shown by #.) reflect light. Together they keep the planet’s temperature in balance.

Details

Category:
Archive
Object Number:
2012-118/18
type:
computer printout
taxonomy:
  • visual and verbal communication
credit:
James Ephraim Lovelock