Telephone by Alexander Graham Bell, 1877.

Made:
1877 in United Kingdom
patentee:
Alexander Graham Bell

Bell telephone instrument used at Lloyds station, patented by Alexander Graham Bell, unknown maker, British, 1877. The mouth/ear piece is not original and was added by the museum in 1906.

This form of magnetic telephone, patented by Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), was one of the first to be brought into practical use, and demonstrates the transition from his early experimental telephones to a more practical one. It was sometimes called a 'box' telephone, due to the shape of the cover which normally protected the magnet and coils. It was the first telephone to use a permanent magnet, which avoided the need for a battery. The small horn could be used as both a mouthpiece and an earpiece. It was used at the Lloyds Signal Station in Cornwall. A large instrument of this type was also used during a demonstration at the Essex Institute, Salem, Mass., on 12 February 1877. The sounds reproduced by it were sufficiently loud to be audible to a large audience, the words having been shouted into a similar instrument in Boston, 26 km away.

Details

Category:
Telecommunications
Object Number:
1906-10/1
Materials:
copper (alloy), metal (unknown) and wood (unidentified)
type:
telephone
taxonomy:
  • component - object
credit:
J.C. Stevens (Auction Sales)