Braille training computer keyboard made by Sydney Smith, 1984

Made:
1984 in Manchester

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Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Braille training computer keyboard made by Sydney Smith, Manchester, in 1984.

This Braille computer equipment was developed by Sidney Smith, an inventor and educator who developed technology and teaching tools and programmes for the blind in the 1970s and 1980s. Smith was a teacher in Manchester who worked with the Open University and the department of Trade and Industry to install his devices and training techniques in eight local schools in 1984.

His equipment consisted of a Braille training computer keyboard, a prototype adapted microcomputer and Braille equipment developed to teach Braille to children. The device uses lights as visual aids to provide feedback to the child when writing Braille. This was seen to be a simpler way of learning Braille than by using a Braille frame on its own.

Details

Category:
Computing & Data Processing
Object Number:
Y1999.33.2.1
type:
computer keyboard