Part of an elm water pipe, England, 1401-1600

Made:
1401-1600 CE in England
maker:
Unknown

Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Elm section of a cylindrical pipe, originally part of an underground water pipe laid in the west of London during the 15th or 16th century.

This water pipe was found during an archaeological excavation in West London in 1902. The pipe originally formed part of an underground network supplying parts of London with water.

Made from elm and measuring 370 mm in diameter and weighing over 8 kg, this type of wood was a popular choice for water pipes as unlike other woods it does not decay when kept permanently wet. Elm pipes were used until the 1700s.

Details

Category:
Classical & Medieval Medicine
Object Number:
A643605
type:
water pipe
taxonomy:
  • pipe - conduit

Cite this page

Rights

We encourage the use and reuse of our collection data.


Data in the title, made, maker and details fields are released under Creative Commons Zero


Descriptions and all other text content are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 licence

Using our data

Download

Download catalogue entry as json

View manifest in IIIF viewer

Add to Animal Crossing Art Generator

Download manifest IIIF

Our records are constantly being enhanced and improved, but please note that we cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information shown on this website.