Glass ampoule of liquid chloroform

Made:
1845-1945 in Paris
maker:
A Vicario
Brown glass ampoule of chloroform. Ampoule alongside box. White perspex background.

Buy this image as a print 

Buy

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

License

Brown glass ampoule of chloroform. Ampoule alongside box. White perspex background.
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Brown glass ampoule of chloroform, made by A Vicario, Paris, France, 1854-1945

Chloroform was used as an anaesthetic from the late 1840s until the 1950s. Liquid chloroform was dropped on to a face mask or vaporised and inhaled by the patient through a face mask. The chloroform was prepared by a Parisian pharmacist, A Vicario. Once the potentially toxic nature of this anaesthetic had become apparent, it was used far more cautiously.

The vial was owned by Sir James Cantlie (1851-1926), a surgeon and medical administrator whose prestigious career included a leading role in setting up the London School of Tropical Medicine and the provision and training of ambulance services during the First World War.

Details

Category:
Anaesthesiology
Object Number:
A56873/1
Materials:
ampoule, glass, ampoule, paper, label and box, paper
Measurements:
ampoule: 140 mm 23 mm, .061 kg
type:
ampoule
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • container - receptacle
  • vessel
credit:
Cantlie, N.