Non-operational APEX autonomous drifting profiler

Made:
2010 in Massachusetts
maker:
Teledyne Webb Research
Argo Float. Front View. Grey Background Argo Float. Detail view. Measuring instruments. Grey Background Argo Float. Detail view. Measuring instruments. Grey Background Argo Float. Detail view. Safety notice. Grey Background

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Argo Float. Front View. Grey Background
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Argo Float. Detail view. Measuring instruments. Grey Background
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Argo Float. Detail view. Measuring instruments. Grey Background
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Argo Float. Detail view. Safety notice. Grey Background
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Non-operational APEX autonomous drifting profiler, by Teledyne Webb Research, Massachusetts, United States, 2010. The Non-operational APEX autonomous drifting profiler was used to measure upper ocean temperature and salinity as part of the global Argo project.

Thousands of these robotic floats continually patrol Earth's upper ocean. The international Argo project was set up to measure how much heat is being absorbed by our oceans, and how the oceans move. Until the project began in 2000, scientific data about the ocean was sparse, mostly limited to measurements made by ships.

Argo floats are helping scientists to understand our complex planet, and the role oceans play in global climate change.

Details

Category:
Oceanography
Object Number:
2010-100/1
credit:
Teledyne Webb Research