Is this your future?: 'Poo' lunch box

Made:
2004
maker:
Dunne & Raby
Is this your future?: 'Poo' lunch box.  Part of an installation commissioned from Dunne & Raby for the Energy Gallery Is this your future?: 'Poo' lunch box.  Part of an installation commissioned from Dunne & Raby for the Energy Gallery

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Is this your future?: 'Poo' lunch box. Part of an installation commissioned from Dunne & Raby for the Energy Gallery
Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Is this your future?: 'Poo' lunch box. Part of an installation commissioned from Dunne & Raby for the Energy Gallery
Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Object designed for the installation 'Is this your future?' by Dunne and Raby, 2004. A box made up of two conjoined poliwood cylinders with white sides and a red lid. The left-hand lid is labelled 'Lunch', the right-hand labelled 'Poo'. Each has a tab to lift the lid. A white strap attaches to either side of the box.

'Is this your future' is a twelve-part installation commissioned from Fiona Raby and Tony Dunne for the Energy Gallery at the Science Museum in 2004. The installation imagined three possible scenarios for alternative future energy use: hydrogen, recycled human poo, and animal blood. Each scenario is presented through a photograph of a family using the alternative energy, alongside 2 or 3 objects. The photographs were taken by Jason Evans, the objects were produced or sourced by Dunne & Raby.

This objects forms part of the recycled poo scenario, where collecting and gifting poo is part of daily life. The little girl would use half of the lunch box to preserve her poo, while keeping her lunch in the other half.

Details

Category:
Art
Object Number:
2019-233/7
Materials:
chemiwood and polyester
type:
artwork
credit:
Commissioned by the Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, 2004