NeoLucida

Made:
2013

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License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

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Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London

NeoLucida optical drawing aid. Modern update on the original camera lucida drawing tool. Designed by Pablo Garcia and Golan Levin in 2013, and manufactured in partnership with Big Idea Design. Funded through Kickstarter.

The NeoLucida is an optical drawing aid that lets you trace what you see. It is a modern reinterpretation of the camera lucida, an indispensable tool popular in the days before photography was invented. How does it work? The NeoLucida prism acts like a beamsplitter; when you look down into the eyepiece, you see a ghost image of your subject on your paper. You can also see your hand, so you can trace from real life.

The NeoLucida is inspired by a long history of optical drawing tools, modernized using 21st century manufacturing and materials.

Details

Category:
Photographic Technology
Object Number:
2019-323
Materials:
glass, metal (unknown) and plastic (unidentified)
Measurements:
box: 170 mm x 295 mm x 30 mm,
type:
camera lucida
taxonomy:
  • tools and equipment
  • equipment by process
  • image viewing equipment
  • image projecting equipment (unit)
credit:
Garcia, Pablo