Watchmaker's hammer from the workshop of James Watt

Made:
1790-1819
maker:
Unknown

Riveting hammer used in watchmaking or light instrument work from the workshop of James Watt.

Riveting hammer used to connect small watch parts, such as wheels to pinions. These could have been used for light, delicate watch work.

James Watt was an inventor, mathematical-instrument maker and engineer. While he was not known to make clocks or watches, these are of a weight suitable for making similar light-weight instruments. Hammers like this were part of the standard toolbox for all instrument makers.

Watt had a workshop in Glasgow at the University where he made and sold mathematical-instruments such as quadrants, compasses and scales. Watt is best known for inventing a separate steam condensor for the Newcomen steam engine, improving its efficiency and making it cheaper to run.

Details

Category:
James Watt's Garret Workshop
Object Number:
1924-792/80/1
Materials:
iron and wood (unidentified)
Measurements:
hammer: 14 mm x 204 mm x 65 mm,
type:
hammer
credit:
Major J.M. Gibson-Watt