Pattern for Gill Sans (Typeface Series number: 262), 12 point

maker:
The Monotype Corporation Limited

Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Buy this image as a print 

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Pattern for Gill Sans (Typeface Series number: 262), 12 point. Copper plate backed with lead. In original wooden tray. Manufactured by Monotype Corporation.

A Monotype pattern is a copper-faced plate bearing, in relief, the shape of a right-reading character or symbol. It is about 3" square and ¼" thick, having a character raised 1/16" on its face. It bears lines denoting clearance and sidewalls, also figures denoting series and size of type. They used to be made in two sizes: ¼ size of the drawing for type sizes up to 24pt, and 3/8 size of the drawing for type sizes over 24pt. The pattern was used as a guide when cutting punches on a punch-cutting machine. If a metal typeface was produced in five sizes, for example, there were not necessarily new patterns made for each size. However, in the case of Caslon Series 128, there were sets of patterns made for each individual size. The punch was stamped into a piece of phosphor bronze that made a matrix from which type could be cast.

The Monotype Corporation successfully commissioned Eric Gill (1882-1940) to produce nine original typefaces, which over the years generated 40 series for the Monotype hot-metal typeface library. Gill is arguably the most important British type designer of the twentieth century. He was a prominent artist-craftsman who was awarded the title of Royal Designer for Industry. Two of Monotype’s bestselling typeface families were Perpetua and Gill Sans, both original Gill designs, that developed from his experience with lettering on paper and stone.

Gill Sans is a sans serif design that has the proportions of classical roman letters. It retains subtle contrasts in stroke widths that make it more readable in continuous text than mono-weight type. The designs of lowercase ‘a’, ‘g’ and capital ‘R’ are not typical of this category of sans serifs. The form of the lowercase a – known as two-storey – and the ‘g’ – likened to a pair of glasses – are traditionally associated with serif letters. The capital ‘R’ is a signature letter for Gill with its distinctive curved leg. It is a good place to start when trying to identify a Gill typeface as he settled on this form and did not deviate from it.

Matrices for this series were made in 25 sizes, from 5pt to 72pt, and the first sizes were released in 1929. The Gill Sans family spawned many weights and styles such as Ultra Bold and Shadow, each with different series numbers.

The immensely successful design made the transition from metal to filmsetting technology and then to digital technology. Over the decades Gill Sans has seen widespread usage by British companies such as London & North Eastern Railway, Penguin Books and the BBC, and on personal computers in the western world.

Details

Category:
Printing & Writing
Object Number:
1995-1107/3
Materials:
copper (metal), lead (metal), metal (unknown) and wood (unidentified)
Measurements:
overall (tray, exc. handle): 40 mm x 280 mm x 360 mm,

Cite this page

Rights

We encourage the use and reuse of our collection data.


Data in the title, made, maker and details fields are released under Creative Commons Zero


Descriptions and all other text content are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 licence

Using our data

Download

Download catalogue entry as json

View manifest in IIIF viewer

Add to Animal Crossing Art Generator

Download manifest IIIF

Our records are constantly being enhanced and improved, but please note that we cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information shown on this website.