Images showing West Indian migrants arriving at London’s Waterloo station in May 1962

Made:
1962-05 in United Kingdom
maker:
Howard Grey
In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey

In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey
Howard Grey

In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey
Howard Grey

In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey
Howard Grey

37 photographic prints taken by Howard Grey showing West Indian migrants arriving at London’s Waterloo station in May 1962 on the boat train from Southampton to Waterloo. The light conditions had meant that the original negatives had not developed properly but were recovered 50 years later using digital technology.

Includes posed and unposed images of passengers looking out of railway carriages and disembarking onto the platform; crowds of people including women with children; images show ticketing equipment and refreshment stands; piles of luggage on platforms; luggage being selected, secured, and carried; passengers talking to station staff; families who appear to be waiting for passengers on platforms; people embracing; a news crew recording footage

In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey, went to Waterloo railway station to capture photographs of the last group of West Indian migrants arriving in Britain before the British government’s Commonwealth Immigration Act of 1962 came into force. The Act ended automatic settlement rights in Britain for Citizens of the UK and Colonies (CUKCs) and Commonwealth citizens, who had been encouraged to move to Britain to address labour shortages in the aftermath of the Second World War. People who moved from the West Indies to live and work in Britain during the period 1948-1971 have since been known as the 'Windrush generation', named after the ship, the Empire Windrush, which carried the first large group of West Indian migrants from Kingston, Jamaica to Tilbury, Britain.

Details

Category:
Photographic Collections (Railway)
Collection:
Howard Grey Windrush Photographic Print Collection
Object Number:
2022-21
Materials:
paper (fibre product)
Measurements:
overall: 270 mm x 300 mm
type:
photography

Parts

Male passengers looking out of a window of a railway carriage with destination board for 'Southampton Docks' onto a crowded station platform

Male passengers looking out of a window of a railway carriage with destination board for 'Southampton Docks' onto a crowded station platform

Male passengers looking out of a window of a railway carriage with destination board for 'Southampton Docks' onto a crowded platform in Waterloo railway station.


In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey, went to Waterloo railway station to capture photographs of the last group of West Indian migrants arriving in Britain before the British government’s Commonwealth Immigration Act of 1962 came into force. The Act ended automatic settlement rights in Britain for Citizens of the UK and Colonies (CUKCs) and Commonwealth citizens, who had been encouraged to move to Britain to address labour shortages in the aftermath of the Second World War. People who moved from the West Indies to live and work in Britain during the period 1948-1971 have since been known as the 'Windrush generation', named after the ship, the Empire Windrush, which carried the first large group of West Indian migrants from Kingston, Jamaica to Tilbury, Britain.

Measurements:
overall: 260 mm x 170 mm
Materials:
paper (fibre product)
Object Number:
2022-21/1
type:
photography
Man standing next to a pillar underneath a sign reading 'Through here for trains to Charing Cross (Strand) London Bridge and South East platforms (A. B. C. & D.)

Man standing next to a pillar underneath a sign reading 'Through here for trains to Charing Cross (Strand) London Bridge and South East platforms (A. B. C. & D.)

Man standing next to a pillar in Waterloo railway station underneath a sign reading 'Through here for trains to Charing Cross (Strand) London Bridge and South East platforms (A. B. C. & D.).


In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey, went to Waterloo railway station to capture photographs of the last group of West Indian migrants arriving in Britain before the British government’s Commonwealth Immigration Act of 1962 came into force. The Act ended automatic settlement rights in Britain for Citizens of the UK and Colonies (CUKCs) and Commonwealth citizens, who had been encouraged to move to Britain to address labour shortages in the aftermath of the Second World War. People who moved from the West Indies to live and work in Britain during the period 1948-1971 have since been known as the 'Windrush generation', named after the ship, the Empire Windrush, which carried the first large group of West Indian migrants from Kingston, Jamaica to Tilbury, Britain.

Measurements:
overall: 260 mm x 170 mm
Materials:
paper (fibre product)
Object Number:
2022-21/2
type:
photography
Men standing next to barriered gates to platform 11

Men standing next to barriered gates to platform 11

Men standing next to barriered gates to platform 11 in Waterloo station


In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey, went to Waterloo railway station to capture photographs of the last group of West Indian migrants arriving in Britain before the British government’s Commonwealth Immigration Act of 1962 came into force. The Act ended automatic settlement rights in Britain for Citizens of the UK and Colonies (CUKCs) and Commonwealth citizens, who had been encouraged to move to Britain to address labour shortages in the aftermath of the Second World War. People who moved from the West Indies to live and work in Britain during the period 1948-1971 have since been known as the 'Windrush generation', named after the ship, the Empire Windrush, which carried the first large group of West Indian migrants from Kingston, Jamaica to Tilbury, Britain.

Measurements:
overall: 260 mm x 170 mm
Materials:
paper (fibre product)
Object Number:
2022-21/3
type:
photography
Women with a baby sitting on benches

Women with a baby sitting on benches

Women with a baby sitting on benches in Waterloo railway station.


In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey, went to Waterloo railway station to capture photographs of the last group of West Indian migrants arriving in Britain before the British government’s Commonwealth Immigration Act of 1962 came into force. The Act ended automatic settlement rights in Britain for Citizens of the UK and Colonies (CUKCs) and Commonwealth citizens, who had been encouraged to move to Britain to address labour shortages in the aftermath of the Second World War. People who moved from the West Indies to live and work in Britain during the period 1948-1971 have since been known as the 'Windrush generation', named after the ship, the Empire Windrush, which carried the first large group of West Indian migrants from Kingston, Jamaica to Tilbury, Britain.

Measurements:
overall: 260 mm x 190 mm
Materials:
paper (fibre product)
Object Number:
2022-21/4
type:
photography
People standing and sitting on a concourse outside the Surrey Room Restaurant

People standing and sitting on a concourse outside the Surrey Room Restaurant

People standing and sitting on a concourse outside the Surrey Room Restaurant in Waterloo railway station.


In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey, went to Waterloo railway station to capture photographs of the last group of West Indian migrants arriving in Britain before the British government’s Commonwealth Immigration Act of 1962 came into force. The Act ended automatic settlement rights in Britain for Citizens of the UK and Colonies (CUKCs) and Commonwealth citizens, who had been encouraged to move to Britain to address labour shortages in the aftermath of the Second World War. People who moved from the West Indies to live and work in Britain during the period 1948-1971 have since been known as the 'Windrush generation', named after the ship, the Empire Windrush, which carried the first large group of West Indian migrants from Kingston, Jamaica to Tilbury, Britain.

Measurements:
overall: 270 mm x 160 mm
Materials:
paper (fibre product)
Object Number:
2022-21/5
type:
photography
Men standing on a platform

Men standing on a platform

Men standing on a platform in Waterloo railway station.


In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey, went to Waterloo railway station to capture photographs of the last group of West Indian migrants arriving in Britain before the British government’s Commonwealth Immigration Act of 1962 came into force. The Act ended automatic settlement rights in Britain for Citizens of the UK and Colonies (CUKCs) and Commonwealth citizens, who had been encouraged to move to Britain to address labour shortages in the aftermath of the Second World War. People who moved from the West Indies to live and work in Britain during the period 1948-1971 have since been known as the 'Windrush generation', named after the ship, the Empire Windrush, which carried the first large group of West Indian migrants from Kingston, Jamaica to Tilbury, Britain.

Measurements:
overall: 260 mm x 170 mm
Materials:
paper (fibre product)
Object Number:
2022-21/6
type:
photography
Girl looking through platform gates next to a platform ticket machine and destination board for 'Portsmouth Harbour and Isle of Wight'

Girl looking through platform gates next to a platform ticket machine and destination board for 'Portsmouth Harbour and Isle of Wight'

Girl looking through platform gates next to a platform ticket machine and destination board for 'Portsmouth Harbour and Isle of Wight' in Waterloo railway station.


In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey, went to Waterloo railway station to capture photographs of the last group of West Indian migrants arriving in Britain before the British government’s Commonwealth Immigration Act of 1962 came into force. The Act ended automatic settlement rights in Britain for Citizens of the UK and Colonies (CUKCs) and Commonwealth citizens, who had been encouraged to move to Britain to address labour shortages in the aftermath of the Second World War. People who moved from the West Indies to live and work in Britain during the period 1948-1971 have since been known as the 'Windrush generation', named after the ship, the Empire Windrush, which carried the first large group of West Indian migrants from Kingston, Jamaica to Tilbury, Britain.

Measurements:
overall: 260 mm x 170 mm
Materials:
paper (fibre product)
Object Number:
2022-21/7
type:
photography
Man and women alighting from a railway carriage

Man and women alighting from a railway carriage

Man and women alighting from a railway carriage in Waterloo railway station.


In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey, went to Waterloo railway station to capture photographs of the last group of West Indian migrants arriving in Britain before the British government’s Commonwealth Immigration Act of 1962 came into force. The Act ended automatic settlement rights in Britain for Citizens of the UK and Colonies (CUKCs) and Commonwealth citizens, who had been encouraged to move to Britain to address labour shortages in the aftermath of the Second World War. People who moved from the West Indies to live and work in Britain during the period 1948-1971 have since been known as the 'Windrush generation', named after the ship, the Empire Windrush, which carried the first large group of West Indian migrants from Kingston, Jamaica to Tilbury, Britain.

Measurements:
overall: 260 mm x 150 mm
Materials:
paper (fibre product)
Object Number:
2022-21/8
type:
photography
Man and woman on a station platform with wicker bag and suitcase marked as belonging to 'Linda Morgan'

Man and woman on a station platform with wicker bag and suitcase marked as belonging to 'Linda Morgan'

Man and woman on a station platform with wicker bag and suitcase marked as belonging to 'Linda Morgan' in Waterloo railway station.


In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey, went to Waterloo railway station to capture photographs of the last group of West Indian migrants arriving in Britain before the British government’s Commonwealth Immigration Act of 1962 came into force. The Act ended automatic settlement rights in Britain for Citizens of the UK and Colonies (CUKCs) and Commonwealth citizens, who had been encouraged to move to Britain to address labour shortages in the aftermath of the Second World War. People who moved from the West Indies to live and work in Britain during the period 1948-1971 have since been known as the 'Windrush generation', named after the ship, the Empire Windrush, which carried the first large group of West Indian migrants from Kingston, Jamaica to Tilbury, Britain.

Measurements:
overall: 260 mm x 170 mm
Materials:
paper (fibre product)
Object Number:
2022-21/9
type:
photography
Railway workers standing alongside a large amount of luggage on a platform

Railway workers standing alongside a large amount of luggage on a platform

Railway workers standing alongside a large amount of luggage on a platform in Waterloo railway station.


In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey, went to Waterloo railway station to capture photographs of the last group of West Indian migrants arriving in Britain before the British government’s Commonwealth Immigration Act of 1962 came into force. The Act ended automatic settlement rights in Britain for Citizens of the UK and Colonies (CUKCs) and Commonwealth citizens, who had been encouraged to move to Britain to address labour shortages in the aftermath of the Second World War. People who moved from the West Indies to live and work in Britain during the period 1948-1971 have since been known as the 'Windrush generation', named after the ship, the Empire Windrush, which carried the first large group of West Indian migrants from Kingston, Jamaica to Tilbury, Britain.

Measurements:
overall: 260 mm x 170 mm
Materials:
paper (fibre product)
Object Number:
2022-21/10
type:
photography
Man carrying a suitcase balanced on his head on a platform

Man carrying a suitcase balanced on his head on a platform

Man carrying a suitcase balanced on his head on a platform in Waterloo railway station.


In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey, went to Waterloo railway station to capture photographs of the last group of West Indian migrants arriving in Britain before the British government’s Commonwealth Immigration Act of 1962 came into force. The Act ended automatic settlement rights in Britain for Citizens of the UK and Colonies (CUKCs) and Commonwealth citizens, who had been encouraged to move to Britain to address labour shortages in the aftermath of the Second World War. People who moved from the West Indies to live and work in Britain during the period 1948-1971 have since been known as the 'Windrush generation', named after the ship, the Empire Windrush, which carried the first large group of West Indian migrants from Kingston, Jamaica to Tilbury, Britain.

Measurements:
overall: 260 mm x 260 mm
Materials:
paper (fibre product)
Object Number:
2022-21/11
type:
photography
Men looking at and walking thorugh a pile of luggage on a splatform next to a carriage seen through platform railings

Men looking at and walking thorugh a pile of luggage on a splatform next to a carriage seen through platform railings

Men looking at and walking thorugh a pile of luggage on a station platform next to a carriage seen through platform railings in Waterloo railway station.


In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey, went to Waterloo railway station to capture photographs of the last group of West Indian migrants arriving in Britain before the British government’s Commonwealth Immigration Act of 1962 came into force. The Act ended automatic settlement rights in Britain for Citizens of the UK and Colonies (CUKCs) and Commonwealth citizens, who had been encouraged to move to Britain to address labour shortages in the aftermath of the Second World War. People who moved from the West Indies to live and work in Britain during the period 1948-1971 have since been known as the 'Windrush generation', named after the ship, the Empire Windrush, which carried the first large group of West Indian migrants from Kingston, Jamaica to Tilbury, Britain.

Measurements:
overall: 260 mm x 190 mm
Materials:
paper (fibre product)
Object Number:
2022-21/12
type:
photography
Men securing a suitcase marked as belonging to '?. O. DeBique U.K.' with twine on a platform

Men securing a suitcase marked as belonging to '?. O. DeBique U.K.' with twine on a platform

Men securing a suitcase marked as belonging to '?. O. DeBique U.K.' with twine on a platform in Waterloo railway station.


In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey, went to Waterloo railway station to capture photographs of the last group of West Indian migrants arriving in Britain before the British government’s Commonwealth Immigration Act of 1962 came into force. The Act ended automatic settlement rights in Britain for Citizens of the UK and Colonies (CUKCs) and Commonwealth citizens, who had been encouraged to move to Britain to address labour shortages in the aftermath of the Second World War. People who moved from the West Indies to live and work in Britain during the period 1948-1971 have since been known as the 'Windrush generation', named after the ship, the Empire Windrush, which carried the first large group of West Indian migrants from Kingston, Jamaica to Tilbury, Britain.

Measurements:
overall: 260 mm x 170 mm
Materials:
paper (fibre product)
Object Number:
2022-21/13
type:
photography
Woman lifting a suitcase from a pile of luggage

Woman lifting a suitcase from a pile of luggage

Woman lifting a suitcase from a pile of luggage in Waterloo railway station.


In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey, went to Waterloo railway station to capture photographs of the last group of West Indian migrants arriving in Britain before the British government’s Commonwealth Immigration Act of 1962 came into force. The Act ended automatic settlement rights in Britain for Citizens of the UK and Colonies (CUKCs) and Commonwealth citizens, who had been encouraged to move to Britain to address labour shortages in the aftermath of the Second World War. People who moved from the West Indies to live and work in Britain during the period 1948-1971 have since been known as the 'Windrush generation', named after the ship, the Empire Windrush, which carried the first large group of West Indian migrants from Kingston, Jamaica to Tilbury, Britain.

Measurements:
overall: 260 mm x 180 mm
Materials:
paper (fibre product)
Object Number:
2022-21/14
type:
photography
Woman reaching down to lift a suitcase from a pile of luggage

Woman reaching down to lift a suitcase from a pile of luggage

Woman reaching down to lift a suitcase from a pile of luggage in Waterloo railway station.


In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey, went to Waterloo railway station to capture photographs of the last group of West Indian migrants arriving in Britain before the British government’s Commonwealth Immigration Act of 1962 came into force. The Act ended automatic settlement rights in Britain for Citizens of the UK and Colonies (CUKCs) and Commonwealth citizens, who had been encouraged to move to Britain to address labour shortages in the aftermath of the Second World War. People who moved from the West Indies to live and work in Britain during the period 1948-1971 have since been known as the 'Windrush generation', named after the ship, the Empire Windrush, which carried the first large group of West Indian migrants from Kingston, Jamaica to Tilbury, Britain.

Measurements:
overall: 260 mm x 180 mm
Materials:
paper (fibre product)
Object Number:
2022-21/15
type:
photography
Man carrying a box on his shoulder amongst a group of people on a platform next to a railway carriage

Man carrying a box on his shoulder amongst a group of people on a platform next to a railway carriage

Man carrying a box on his shoulder amongst a group of people on a platform next to a railway carriage in Waterloo railway station.


In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey, went to Waterloo railway station to capture photographs of the last group of West Indian migrants arriving in Britain before the British government’s Commonwealth Immigration Act of 1962 came into force. The Act ended automatic settlement rights in Britain for Citizens of the UK and Colonies (CUKCs) and Commonwealth citizens, who had been encouraged to move to Britain to address labour shortages in the aftermath of the Second World War. People who moved from the West Indies to live and work in Britain during the period 1948-1971 have since been known as the 'Windrush generation', named after the ship, the Empire Windrush, which carried the first large group of West Indian migrants from Kingston, Jamaica to Tilbury, Britain.

Measurements:
overall: 260 mm x 170 mm
Materials:
paper (fibre product)
Object Number:
2022-21/16
type:
photography
Man picking up a package from a pile of luggage next to a pillar

Man picking up a package from a pile of luggage next to a pillar

Man picking up a package from a pile of luggage next to a pillar in Waterloo railway station.


In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey, went to Waterloo railway station to capture photographs of the last group of West Indian migrants arriving in Britain before the British government’s Commonwealth Immigration Act of 1962 came into force. The Act ended automatic settlement rights in Britain for Citizens of the UK and Colonies (CUKCs) and Commonwealth citizens, who had been encouraged to move to Britain to address labour shortages in the aftermath of the Second World War. People who moved from the West Indies to live and work in Britain during the period 1948-1971 have since been known as the 'Windrush generation', named after the ship, the Empire Windrush, which carried the first large group of West Indian migrants from Kingston, Jamaica to Tilbury, Britain.

Measurements:
overall: 240 mm x 300 mm
Materials:
paper (fibre product)
Object Number:
2022-21/17
type:
photography
People picking suitcases from a pile of luggage on a platform next to a railway carriage viewed through railings

People picking suitcases from a pile of luggage on a platform next to a railway carriage viewed through railings

People picking suitcases from a pile of luggage on a platform next to a railway carriage viewed through railings in Waterloo railway station.


In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey, went to Waterloo railway station to capture photographs of the last group of West Indian migrants arriving in Britain before the British government’s Commonwealth Immigration Act of 1962 came into force. The Act ended automatic settlement rights in Britain for Citizens of the UK and Colonies (CUKCs) and Commonwealth citizens, who had been encouraged to move to Britain to address labour shortages in the aftermath of the Second World War. People who moved from the West Indies to live and work in Britain during the period 1948-1971 have since been known as the 'Windrush generation', named after the ship, the Empire Windrush, which carried the first large group of West Indian migrants from Kingston, Jamaica to Tilbury, Britain.

Measurements:
overall: 260 mm x 200 mm
Materials:
paper (fibre product)
Object Number:
2022-21/18
type:
photography
Man picking up a package labelled '1/2 dozen 4230-4231-0 Lamp fount asst...' from a pile of luggage next to a pillar

Man picking up a package labelled '1/2 dozen 4230-4231-0 Lamp fount asst...' from a pile of luggage next to a pillar

Man picking up a package labelled '1/2 dozen 4230-4231-0 Lamp fount asst...' from a pile of luggage next to a pillar in Waterloo railway station.


In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey, went to Waterloo railway station to capture photographs of the last group of West Indian migrants arriving in Britain before the British government’s Commonwealth Immigration Act of 1962 came into force. The Act ended automatic settlement rights in Britain for Citizens of the UK and Colonies (CUKCs) and Commonwealth citizens, who had been encouraged to move to Britain to address labour shortages in the aftermath of the Second World War. People who moved from the West Indies to live and work in Britain during the period 1948-1971 have since been known as the 'Windrush generation', named after the ship, the Empire Windrush, which carried the first large group of West Indian migrants from Kingston, Jamaica to Tilbury, Britain.

Measurements:
overall: 260 mm x 170 mm
Materials:
paper (fibre product)
Object Number:
2022-21/19
type:
photography
Men picking up a suitcase and instrument case marked as belonging to 'J. Campbell' from a pile of luggage on a platform

Men picking up a suitcase and instrument case marked as belonging to 'J. Campbell' from a pile of luggage on a platform

Men picking up a suitcase and instrument case marked as belonging to 'J. Campbell' from a pile of luggage on a platform in Waterloo railway station.


In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey, went to Waterloo railway station to capture photographs of the last group of West Indian migrants arriving in Britain before the British government’s Commonwealth Immigration Act of 1962 came into force. The Act ended automatic settlement rights in Britain for Citizens of the UK and Colonies (CUKCs) and Commonwealth citizens, who had been encouraged to move to Britain to address labour shortages in the aftermath of the Second World War. People who moved from the West Indies to live and work in Britain during the period 1948-1971 have since been known as the 'Windrush generation', named after the ship, the Empire Windrush, which carried the first large group of West Indian migrants from Kingston, Jamaica to Tilbury, Britain.

Measurements:
overall: 260 mm x 180 mm
Materials:
paper (fibre product)
Object Number:
2022-21/20
type:
photography
Men stand next to a pile of luggage on a crowded platform

Men stand next to a pile of luggage on a crowded platform

Men stand next to a pile of luggage on a crowded platform in Waterloo railway station.


In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey, went to Waterloo railway station to capture photographs of the last group of West Indian migrants arriving in Britain before the British government’s Commonwealth Immigration Act of 1962 came into force. The Act ended automatic settlement rights in Britain for Citizens of the UK and Colonies (CUKCs) and Commonwealth citizens, who had been encouraged to move to Britain to address labour shortages in the aftermath of the Second World War. People who moved from the West Indies to live and work in Britain during the period 1948-1971 have since been known as the 'Windrush generation', named after the ship, the Empire Windrush, which carried the first large group of West Indian migrants from Kingston, Jamaica to Tilbury, Britain.

Measurements:
overall: 260 mm x 180 mm
Materials:
paper (fibre product)
Object Number:
2022-21/21
type:
photography
Man facing the camera amongst crowds on a platform

Man facing the camera amongst crowds on a platform

Man facing the camera amongst crowds on a platform in Waterloo railway station.


In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey, went to Waterloo railway station to capture photographs of the last group of West Indian migrants arriving in Britain before the British government’s Commonwealth Immigration Act of 1962 came into force. The Act ended automatic settlement rights in Britain for Citizens of the UK and Colonies (CUKCs) and Commonwealth citizens, who had been encouraged to move to Britain to address labour shortages in the aftermath of the Second World War. People who moved from the West Indies to live and work in Britain during the period 1948-1971 have since been known as the 'Windrush generation', named after the ship, the Empire Windrush, which carried the first large group of West Indian migrants from Kingston, Jamaica to Tilbury, Britain.

Measurements:
overall: 260 mm x 180 mm
Materials:
paper (fibre product)
Object Number:
2022-21/22
type:
photography
Crowd carrying luggage on a platform next to a railway carriage viewed through platform railings

Crowd carrying luggage on a platform next to a railway carriage viewed through platform railings

Crowd carrying luggage on a platform next to a railway carriage viewed through railings in Waterloo railway station.


In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey, went to Waterloo railway station to capture photographs of the last group of West Indian migrants arriving in Britain before the British government’s Commonwealth Immigration Act of 1962 came into force. The Act ended automatic settlement rights in Britain for Citizens of the UK and Colonies (CUKCs) and Commonwealth citizens, who had been encouraged to move to Britain to address labour shortages in the aftermath of the Second World War. People who moved from the West Indies to live and work in Britain during the period 1948-1971 have since been known as the 'Windrush generation', named after the ship, the Empire Windrush, which carried the first large group of West Indian migrants from Kingston, Jamaica to Tilbury, Britain.

Measurements:
overall: 260 mm x 170 mm
Materials:
paper (fibre product)
Object Number:
2022-21/23
type:
photography
People in discussion on a platform next to a railway carriage

People in discussion on a platform next to a railway carriage

People in discussion on a platform next to a railway carriage in Waterloo railway station.


In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey, went to Waterloo railway station to capture photographs of the last group of West Indian migrants arriving in Britain before the British government’s Commonwealth Immigration Act of 1962 came into force. The Act ended automatic settlement rights in Britain for Citizens of the UK and Colonies (CUKCs) and Commonwealth citizens, who had been encouraged to move to Britain to address labour shortages in the aftermath of the Second World War. People who moved from the West Indies to live and work in Britain during the period 1948-1971 have since been known as the 'Windrush generation', named after the ship, the Empire Windrush, which carried the first large group of West Indian migrants from Kingston, Jamaica to Tilbury, Britain.

Measurements:
overall: 260 mm x 180 mm
Materials:
paper (fibre product)
Object Number:
2022-21/24
type:
photography
People standing next to open platform gates

People standing next to open platform gates

People standing next to open platform gates in Waterloo railway station. The woman in white stillettos is Esther Campbell and the man standing behind her in a bowler hat is Vincent Campbell, her husband.


In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey, went to Waterloo railway station to capture photographs of the last group of West Indian migrants arriving in Britain before the British government’s Commonwealth Immigration Act of 1962 came into force. The Act ended automatic settlement rights in Britain for Citizens of the UK and Colonies (CUKCs) and Commonwealth citizens, who had been encouraged to move to Britain to address labour shortages in the aftermath of the Second World War. People who moved from the West Indies to live and work in Britain during the period 1948-1971 have since been known as the 'Windrush generation', named after the ship, the Empire Windrush, which carried the first large group of West Indian migrants from Kingston, Jamaica to Tilbury, Britain.

Measurements:
overall: 260 mm x 260 mm
Materials:
paper (fibre product)
Object Number:
2022-21/25
type:
photography
Men leaning against platform gates

Men leaning against platform gates

Men leaning against platform gates in Waterloo railway station.


In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey, went to Waterloo railway station to capture photographs of the last group of West Indian migrants arriving in Britain before the British government’s Commonwealth Immigration Act of 1962 came into force. The Act ended automatic settlement rights in Britain for Citizens of the UK and Colonies (CUKCs) and Commonwealth citizens, who had been encouraged to move to Britain to address labour shortages in the aftermath of the Second World War. People who moved from the West Indies to live and work in Britain during the period 1948-1971 have since been known as the 'Windrush generation', named after the ship, the Empire Windrush, which carried the first large group of West Indian migrants from Kingston, Jamaica to Tilbury, Britain.

Measurements:
overall: 260 mm x 260 mm
Materials:
paper (fibre product)
Object Number:
2022-21/26
type:
photography
Man getting into a taxi

Man getting into a taxi

Man getting into a taxi outside of Waterloo railway station.


In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey, went to Waterloo railway station to capture photographs of the last group of West Indian migrants arriving in Britain before the British government’s Commonwealth Immigration Act of 1962 came into force. The Act ended automatic settlement rights in Britain for Citizens of the UK and Colonies (CUKCs) and Commonwealth citizens, who had been encouraged to move to Britain to address labour shortages in the aftermath of the Second World War. People who moved from the West Indies to live and work in Britain during the period 1948-1971 have since been known as the 'Windrush generation', named after the ship, the Empire Windrush, which carried the first large group of West Indian migrants from Kingston, Jamaica to Tilbury, Britain.

Measurements:
overall: 260 mm x 220 mm
Materials:
paper (fibre product)
Object Number:
2022-21/27
type:
photography
Figures seen through platform gates

Figures seen through platform gates

Figures seen through platform gates in Waterloo railway station.


In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey, went to Waterloo railway station to capture photographs of the last group of West Indian migrants arriving in Britain before the British government’s Commonwealth Immigration Act of 1962 came into force. The Act ended automatic settlement rights in Britain for Citizens of the UK and Colonies (CUKCs) and Commonwealth citizens, who had been encouraged to move to Britain to address labour shortages in the aftermath of the Second World War. People who moved from the West Indies to live and work in Britain during the period 1948-1971 have since been known as the 'Windrush generation', named after the ship, the Empire Windrush, which carried the first large group of West Indian migrants from Kingston, Jamaica to Tilbury, Britain.

Measurements:
overall: 260 mm x 260 mm
Materials:
paper (fibre product)
Object Number:
2022-21/28
type:
photography
Television news crew filming passengers on a platform next to a railway luggage van

Television news crew filming passengers on a platform next to a railway luggage van

Television news crew filming passengers on a platform next to a railway luggage van in Waterloo railway station.


In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey, went to Waterloo railway station to capture photographs of the last group of West Indian migrants arriving in Britain before the British government’s Commonwealth Immigration Act of 1962 came into force. The Act ended automatic settlement rights in Britain for Citizens of the UK and Colonies (CUKCs) and Commonwealth citizens, who had been encouraged to move to Britain to address labour shortages in the aftermath of the Second World War. People who moved from the West Indies to live and work in Britain during the period 1948-1971 have since been known as the 'Windrush generation', named after the ship, the Empire Windrush, which carried the first large group of West Indian migrants from Kingston, Jamaica to Tilbury, Britain.

Measurements:
overall: 260 mm x 190 mm
Materials:
paper (fibre product)
Object Number:
2022-21/29
type:
photography
Television news crew filming a train arriving at a platform

Television news crew filming a train arriving at a platform

Television news crew filming a train arriving at a platform in Waterloo railway station.


In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey, went to Waterloo railway station to capture photographs of the last group of West Indian migrants arriving in Britain before the British government’s Commonwealth Immigration Act of 1962 came into force. The Act ended automatic settlement rights in Britain for Citizens of the UK and Colonies (CUKCs) and Commonwealth citizens, who had been encouraged to move to Britain to address labour shortages in the aftermath of the Second World War. People who moved from the West Indies to live and work in Britain during the period 1948-1971 have since been known as the 'Windrush generation', named after the ship, the Empire Windrush, which carried the first large group of West Indian migrants from Kingston, Jamaica to Tilbury, Britain.

Measurements:
overall: 260 mm x 260 mm
Materials:
paper (fibre product)
Object Number:
2022-21/30
type:
photography
Women and children in a crowd

Women and children in a crowd

Women and children in a crowd in Waterloo railway station


In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey, went to Waterloo railway station to capture photographs of the last group of West Indian migrants arriving in Britain before the British government’s Commonwealth Immigration Act of 1962 came into force. The Act ended automatic settlement rights in Britain for Citizens of the UK and Colonies (CUKCs) and Commonwealth citizens, who had been encouraged to move to Britain to address labour shortages in the aftermath of the Second World War. People who moved from the West Indies to live and work in Britain during the period 1948-1971 have since been known as the 'Windrush generation', named after the ship, the Empire Windrush, which carried the first large group of West Indian migrants from Kingston, Jamaica to Tilbury, Britain.

Measurements:
overall: 260 mm x 170 mm
Materials:
paper (fibre product)
Object Number:
2022-21/31
type:
photography
Women embracing on platform

Women embracing on platform

Women embracing on platform in Waterloo railway station.


In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey, went to Waterloo railway station to capture photographs of the last group of West Indian migrants arriving in Britain before the British government’s Commonwealth Immigration Act of 1962 came into force. The Act ended automatic settlement rights in Britain for Citizens of the UK and Colonies (CUKCs) and Commonwealth citizens, who had been encouraged to move to Britain to address labour shortages in the aftermath of the Second World War. People who moved from the West Indies to live and work in Britain during the period 1948-1971 have since been known as the 'Windrush generation', named after the ship, the Empire Windrush, which carried the first large group of West Indian migrants from Kingston, Jamaica to Tilbury, Britain.

Measurements:
overall: 260 mm x 180 mm
Materials:
paper (fibre product)
Object Number:
2022-21/32
type:
photography
Women greeting one another in a crowd on a platform next to a railway carriage

Women greeting one another in a crowd on a platform next to a railway carriage

Women greeting one another in a crowd on a platform next to a railway carriage in Waterloo railway station.


In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey, went to Waterloo railway station to capture photographs of the last group of West Indian migrants arriving in Britain before the British government’s Commonwealth Immigration Act of 1962 came into force. The Act ended automatic settlement rights in Britain for Citizens of the UK and Colonies (CUKCs) and Commonwealth citizens, who had been encouraged to move to Britain to address labour shortages in the aftermath of the Second World War. People who moved from the West Indies to live and work in Britain during the period 1948-1971 have since been known as the 'Windrush generation', named after the ship, the Empire Windrush, which carried the first large group of West Indian migrants from Kingston, Jamaica to Tilbury, Britain.

Measurements:
overall: 260 mm x 180 mm
Materials:
paper (fibre product)
Object Number:
2022-21/33
type:
photography
Woman and a child embracing in a crowd next to a pillar

Woman and a child embracing in a crowd next to a pillar

Woman and a child embracing in a crowd next to a pillar in Waterloo railway station.


In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey, went to Waterloo railway station to capture photographs of the last group of West Indian migrants arriving in Britain before the British government’s Commonwealth Immigration Act of 1962 came into force. The Act ended automatic settlement rights in Britain for Citizens of the UK and Colonies (CUKCs) and Commonwealth citizens, who had been encouraged to move to Britain to address labour shortages in the aftermath of the Second World War. People who moved from the West Indies to live and work in Britain during the period 1948-1971 have since been known as the 'Windrush generation', named after the ship, the Empire Windrush, which carried the first large group of West Indian migrants from Kingston, Jamaica to Tilbury, Britain.

Measurements:
overall: 260 mm x 180 mm
Materials:
paper (fibre product)
Object Number:
2022-21/34
type:
photography
People buying items from a refreshments stand on a concourse

People buying items from a refreshments stand on a concourse

People buying items from a refreshments stand on a station concourse in Waterloo railway station.


In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey, went to Waterloo railway station to capture photographs of the last group of West Indian migrants arriving in Britain before the British government’s Commonwealth Immigration Act of 1962 came into force. The Act ended automatic settlement rights in Britain for Citizens of the UK and Colonies (CUKCs) and Commonwealth citizens, who had been encouraged to move to Britain to address labour shortages in the aftermath of the Second World War. People who moved from the West Indies to live and work in Britain during the period 1948-1971 have since been known as the 'Windrush generation', named after the ship, the Empire Windrush, which carried the first large group of West Indian migrants from Kingston, Jamaica to Tilbury, Britain.

Measurements:
overall: 260 mm x 190 mm
Materials:
paper (fibre product)
Object Number:
2022-21/35
type:
photography
Men, women and children stand on a concourse next to a newspaper stand

Men, women and children stand on a concourse next to a newspaper stand

Men, women and children stand on a concourse next to a newspaper stand in Waterloo railway station.


In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey, went to Waterloo railway station to capture photographs of the last group of West Indian migrants arriving in Britain before the British government’s Commonwealth Immigration Act of 1962 came into force. The Act ended automatic settlement rights in Britain for Citizens of the UK and Colonies (CUKCs) and Commonwealth citizens, who had been encouraged to move to Britain to address labour shortages in the aftermath of the Second World War. People who moved from the West Indies to live and work in Britain during the period 1948-1971 have since been known as the 'Windrush generation', named after the ship, the Empire Windrush, which carried the first large group of West Indian migrants from Kingston, Jamaica to Tilbury, Britain.

Measurements:
overall: 260 mm x 180 mm
Materials:
paper (fibre product)
Object Number:
2022-21/36
type:
photography
People greeting one another on a platform next to a railway carriage

People greeting one another on a platform next to a railway carriage

People greeting one another on a station platform next to a railway carriage in Waterloo railway station.


In May 1962, a then 20-year-old photographer, Howard Grey, went to Waterloo railway station to capture photographs of the last group of West Indian migrants arriving in Britain before the British government’s Commonwealth Immigration Act of 1962 came into force. The Act ended automatic settlement rights in Britain for Citizens of the UK and Colonies (CUKCs) and Commonwealth citizens, who had been encouraged to move to Britain to address labour shortages in the aftermath of the Second World War. People who moved from the West Indies to live and work in Britain during the period 1948-1971 have since been known as the 'Windrush generation', named after the ship, the Empire Windrush, which carried the first large group of West Indian migrants from Kingston, Jamaica to Tilbury, Britain.

Measurements:
overall: 260 mm x 170 mm
Materials:
paper (fibre product)
Object Number:
2022-21/37
type:
photography