Falcon-headed canopic jar

Made:
2000-100

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Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London.

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London.

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London.

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London.

Limestone falcon headed canopic jar, Egyptian, 2000BC - 100AD

Canopic jars held the internal organs of the dead.

During the preparation for mummification, the brains were removed through the nostrils, and then an incision was made in the side of the body and all the major organs removed and placed in canopic jars. Four organs would be removed each time and four jars used to protect them.

The falcon is associated with the god Horus.

Details

Category:
Classical & Medieval Medicine
Collection:
Sir Henry Wellcome's Museum Collection
Object Number:
A635053
type:
canopic jar
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • container - receptacle
  • ceremonial container
credit:
Loan, Wellcome Trust