Potain type sphygmomanometer, Paris, France, 1898-1910

Made:
1898-1910 in Paris
maker:
Charles Verdin
Potain sphygmomanometer, by Charles Verdin, in case, belonged to T. Lauder Brenton, French, 1898-1910.
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Potain sphygmomanometer, by Charles Verdin, in case, belonged to T. Lauder Brenton, French, 1898-1910. Full view,
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Potain sphygmomanometer, in case, which belonged to T. Lauder Brenton. Made by Charles Verdin and G. Boulitte Sr, 7 rue Linne, Paris, France, 1898-1910.

A sphygmomanometer measures blood pressure. This example is of a type designed by Charles Potain (1925-1907). It has an aneroid barometer dial showing changes in blood pressure. Modern examples have an inflatable cuff and graduated U tube. Maximum blood pressure is taken using a pelotte, or bulb. This was pressed onto the radial artery in the arm until the pulse disappeared. Potain’s sphygmomanometer differs from earlier examples in that the pelotte contains air, not water. This example belonged to British physician Sir Thomas Lauder Brunton (1844-1916).

Details

Category:
Clinical Diagnosis
Object Number:
A600273
Materials:
felt, glass, leather, metal (unknown), rubber (unidentified), textile and wood (unidentified)
Measurements:
overall - open: 124 mm x 143 mm x 118 mm, .232 kg
overall - closed: 47 mm x 143 mm x 101 mm, .232 kg
type:
sphygmomanometer