Carwardine type saccharometer, England, 1894-1930

Made:
1894-1930 in England
maker:
Unknown

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Saccharometer, Carwardine, in cardboard case, instructions pasted in lid, English(?), 1861-1930

A saccharometer determined the quantity of sugar in urine. This condition is known as diabetes. Doctors in ancient Greece recognised some people’s urine was sweet-smelling. A chemical test was devised late in the 1800s to estimate the amount of sugar present. Urine was mixed with a chemical called Fehling’s solution and heated. Sugar quantity was then assessed by comparison with a chart. This saccharometer was introduced by Thomas Carwardine, a physician at the Middlesex Hospital around 1894. It was used in the consulting room or at the patient’s bedside. It produced a result in minutes. The box contains a graduated measure, three test tubes, two ring grips and instructions.

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Details

Category:
Clinical Diagnosis
Object Number:
A608020
Materials:
case, cardboard and tubes, glass
type:
saccharometer
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • measuring device - instrument
  • densimeter
  • hydrometer
  • furnishing and equipment
  • measuring device - instrument
  • densimeter
  • hydrometer
  • furnishing and equipment
  • measuring device - instrument
  • densimeter

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