Thoma haemacytometer, Germany, 1891-1930

Made:
1891-1930 in Jena
maker:
Carl Zeiss, Jena

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Thoma haemacytometer with pipettes, counting chamber in leatherette case, by C. Zeiss, German, 1891-1930

A haemacytometer calculates the number of blood cells within a given amount of blood. The first haemacytometer was invented by German physician, Karl Vierordt (1818-84) in 1852. His invention was later adapted by many others. Any increase or decrease in blood cells in the blood is analysed. It may indicate disease within the body. A low level of red blood cells is called anaemia. A high level of red blood cells is called polycythaemia. This haemacytometer is seen with pipettes and counting chamber. It was made by Carl Zeiss in Jena, Germany.

Details

Category:
Clinical Diagnosis
Object Number:
A608059
Materials:
case lining, velvet, case, leatherette, covered, tubing ends, plastic and tubing, rubber
type:
haemacytometer
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • tools & equipment
  • medical instrument