Sahli haemaglobinometer, London, England, 1890-1910

Made:
1890-1910 in London
maker:
Hawksley and Sons Limited
Sahli haemoglobinometer with leatherette case, made by Hawksley, London, 1890-1910.
      Full view, no case. Graduated matt

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Sahli haemoglobinometer with leatherette case, made by Hawksley, London, 1890-1910. Full view, no case. Graduated matt
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Sahli haemaglobinometer with leatherette case, made by Hawksley and Sons Limited, 17 New Cavendish Street, London, England, 1890-1910.

British neurologist William Gowers (1845-1915) invented the haemoglobinometer in 1875. It rapidly tested the amount of haemoglobin in blood by comparing its colour with a reference tube. Haemoglobin is the part of the blood responsible for carrying oxygen around the body. It is essential for a healthy diet. The Sahli haemoglobinometer was devised by Hermann Sahli (1856-1933). It was made by Hawksley and Sons Limited in London. It is still available to buy through the company.

Details

Category:
Clinical Diagnosis
Collection:
Sir Henry Wellcome's Museum Collection
Object Number:
A608060
Materials:
case lining, velvet and case, leatherette
type:
haemoglobinometer
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • tools & equipment
  • medical instrument