Diorama showing René Laennec examining a patient at the Necker Hospital, England, made c. 1945-1960

Made:
1945-1960 in London
maker:
Wellcome Institute
Diorama 'The Rise of Clinical Medicine' showing Rene Laennec examiing a patient at the Hospital Necker in Paris in 1816.

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Diorama 'The Rise of Clinical Medicine' showing Rene Laennec examiing a patient at the Hospital Necker in Paris in 1816.
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Diorama "The Rise of Clinical Medicine" showing Rene Laennec examining a patient at the Hopital Necker in Paris in 1816, made by Wellcome Institute, London, 1945-1960

Set in the Necker Hospital in Paris, France, in 1816, this diorama shows René Laennec (1781-1826) examining a patient. He is listening to the patient’s chest with his new invention, the monaural stethoscope. Before the stethoscope, the physician had to place his ear to the patient’s chest or body to hear sound. But physical contact between patients and physicians (who were mostly male) was minimal and considered inappropriate when consulting female patients. Laennec found that using a hollow tube amplified the sounds made by the body and put some distance between him and his patient.

Listening to the chest can help physicians diagnose illness such as bronchitis and tuberculosis. Almost two hundred years later, the stethoscope is still a valuable tool used by physicians. Today, however, the stethoscope typically has two earpieces.

Details

Category:
Clinical Diagnosis
Object Number:
A626415
Materials:
glass, metal, plaster and wood
type:
diorama
taxonomy:
  • visual and verbal communication
  • furnishing and equipment
  • tools & equipment
  • medical instrument
  • stethoscope