Electrocardiograph, London, England, 1970-1990

Made:
1970-1990 in London

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Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

"Minigraph" Electrocardiograph, type 41, from the Occupational Health Department of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, by Cardiac Recorders Ltd, London, England, 1970-1990

An electrocardiograph produces ‘traces’ or visual graphical records of electrical activity in a person’s heart. The records are called electrocardiograms or ECGs and are examined by physicians for irregularities indicating disease, birth defects or heart attacks. This example was made by the Cardiac Recorders Ltd and used at the London School of Tropical Medicine.

Around 1903, Dutch physiologist Willem Einthoven (1860-1927) invented the string galvanometer. This made electrocardiography possible. Einthoven won a Nobel Prize for his invention.

Details

Category:
Clinical Diagnosis
Object Number:
1992-561
Materials:
metal, paper, plastic and textile
type:
electrocardiograph
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • tools & equipment
credit:
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine