Packet of umbilical cord dressing

Made:
1925-1935 in Chesterfield

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Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Packets of umbilical cord dressing, made by Robinson and Sons Ltd., Chesterfield, English, 1925-1935

Umbilical cord dressings are contained in these 12 packets. Each dressing is a piece of square lint, from which a hole the size of a 20 pence coin has been cut from the middle. The umbilical cord is the tube connecting the foetus and placenta and it is severed after birth. The remaining cord is often tied with umbilical tape to prevent infection within the navel and these dressings were intended to help prevent excessive bleeding after the cord was cut.

They were made by Robinson and Sons Limited of Chesterfield and were donated to the Science Museum as part of a large collection of midwifery, nursing and child care items. These were accumulated by Mrs Gertrude Lilian Baker, a former nurse.

Details

Category:
Obstetrics, Gynaecology & Contraception
Object Number:
1982-561/25
Materials:
lint and packet, paper
type:
umbilical cord dressing
credit:
Mirrielees, Esther