Diorama illustrating childbirth in the 1860s, England, made in 1979

Made:
1979 in East Horsley
maker:
Freeborns
"Childbith in the 1860s", diorama for Lower Wellcome Gallery, which includes adminstration of anaesthetic. From a Childbith in the 1860s diorama for Lower Wellcome Gallery which includes adminstration of anaesthetic. From a colour

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"Childbith in the 1860s", diorama for Lower Wellcome Gallery, which includes adminstration of anaesthetic. From a
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Childbith in the 1860s diorama for Lower Wellcome Gallery which includes adminstration of anaesthetic. From a colour
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

"Childbirth in the 1860s", diorama for Lower Wellcome Gallery, which includes administration of anaesthetic

This is a diorama illustrating a home childbirth in the mid 19th century and it was made in 1979. A doctor and nurse can be seen administering an anaesthetic to the woman in labour. Anaesthesia was used from the 1850s to relieve the pain of childbirth. A servant is entering the room with a large kettle and a fourth attendant, possibly a relative, is standing at the bed with an anxious expression. The doctor is the only man present at the birth. The interior scene was made by Derek and Patricia Freeborn Ltd, in East Horsley, Surrey, England.

Details

Category:
Obstetrics, Gynaecology & Contraception
Object Number:
1986-1528
Materials:
fabric, paper, plaster and wood
type:
diorama
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • tools & equipment
  • visual and verbal communication
credit:
Derek and Patricia Freeborn Limited