Cervical cap, ‘Improved Gem’ type

Made:
1930-1960 in United Kingdom

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

Buy

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

License

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

Buy

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

License

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

Buy

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

License

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

Buy

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

License

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London.

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London.

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London.

Cervical cap, rubber covered with sponge, the "Improved Gem", patented in 1929

A woman inserts a cervical cap before sex. It is a barrier contraceptive. The cap sits over the cervix. It acts as a barrier to sperm entering the uterus. Cervical caps come in different sizes and material including rubber, plastic and metal. This cap is known as the ‘Improved Gem’ type. It was patented in 1929. It is made of rubber covered with a sponge to hold spermicidal cream. The cap was supplied by the Mother’s Clinic. This was founded by Dr Marie Stopes (1880-1958) in 1921.

Details

Category:
Obstetrics, Gynaecology & Contraception
Collection:
Sir Henry Wellcome's Museum Collection
Object Number:
A606507
Materials:
complete, cotton (fibre), rubber (unidentified) and sponge
type:
cervical cap
credit:
Marie Stopes Memorial Foundation