Intra-uterine device, ‘Copper-7’

PART OF:
20 assorted intrauterine devices
Made:
1970-1981 in Finland and United Kingdom
Intra-uterine device, ‘Copper-7’ (intra-uterine device)

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Intra-uterine device, "Fincoid", copper and plastic, Finland, 1970-1981

The ‘Copper-7’ intrauterine device (IUD) is named because of its distinctive shape and material. It is a contraceptive worn inside the uterus. An IUD prevents pregnancy by stopping a new embryo implanting and growing in the lining of the uterus. The copper is toxic to sperm, preventing fertilisation. IUDs became popular in the 1960s and 1970s. However, health scares and litigation in the 1980s saw their use decline. New, more reliable designs were introduced during this time and the IUD remains the most inexpensive long-term reversible method of contraception.

Details

Category:
Obstetrics, Gynaecology & Contraception
Object Number:
1981-1396 Pt2
Materials:
plastic and copper
type:
intra-uterine device
credit:
Institute of Population Studies