Silver tongue scraper, London, England, 1827

Made:
1827 in London
maker:
William Knight
and
William King

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Tongue scraper, English, silver, London hallmark, marked W. K. 1827

Tongue scrapers were used to remove the ‘furry’ deposits that can build up on the tongue after eating, drinking and smoking. This particular type was known as a ‘wishbone’ because of its shape. They symbolise a growing interest in oral healthcare and would be used either during a visit to the dentist or in the home.

Scrapers could be made from a range of materials including ivory, tortoiseshell, gold and silver. Silver scrapers generally came into use after 1800.

Details

Category:
Dentistry
Object Number:
A119216
type:
tongue scraper
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • tools & equipment
credit:
Glendining