Sample of first nylon knitted tubing

Made:
1935 in Wilmington

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Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Sample of first nylon knitted tubing. Knitted July 1935 from polyamide made from pentamethylenediamine and sebacic acid.

The release in 1938 of nylon, the first commercial synthetic fibre, ushered in a fashion and textile revolution. This experimental length was the first specimen to prove that it was possible to create a potentially wearable fabric from a totally synthetic substance. After 11 years of research costing $27 million, nylon was invented by a 200-strong team working for DuPont in the USA.

Details

Category:
Plastics and Modern Materials
Object Number:
1965-480
Materials:
PA, nylon and polyamide
type:
tubes
credit:
Du Pont de Nemours and Co., Philadelphia.