Pastille burner in the shape of a house

Made:
1821-1850 in Europe
Pastille burner in shape of house, c. 1821-1850. Graduated black background. Pastille burner in shape of house, c. 1821-1850. Main part  of house seperated from base. Graduated black background.

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Pastille burner in shape of house, c. 1821-1850. Graduated black background.
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Pastille burner in shape of house, c. 1821-1850. Main part of house seperated from base. Graduated black background.
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Pastille burner in shape of house, c. 1821-1850.

In the 1800s pastilles were burnt to produce fragrant smells in an attempt to fumigate or deodorise what could often be very foul smelling air. In this burner, vapours would have travelled up through the chimney of the model house and out into the room.

In the mid-1800s, theories of disease focussed on the idea of miasmas – foul smelling vapours that were believed to carry and spread disease. Domestic devices like these, while not protecting the householder, could at least rid the house of the worst of the offending odours.

Details

Category:
Public Health & Hygiene
Object Number:
A600108
Materials:
complete, paint and pottery
Measurements:
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type:
pastille burner
credit:
Loan, Wellcome Trust