Packaging for a box of polio vaccine, England, 1964-1966

Made:
1964-1966 in Greenford
maker:
Glaxo Laboratories Limited

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External packaging sleeve for box of poliomyelitis vaccine, in five 10 dose containers, by Glaxo Laboratories Ltd, Greenford, England, 1964-1966

The vaccine is used to protect against polio. The liquid vaccine can either be dropped on to the back of the tongue or swallowed on a sugar lump – a real life example of the old saying “A spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down”. This vaccine is known as a Sabin vaccine, named after its inventor the American bacteriologist Albert Sabin (1906-1993). He developed the vaccine in the 1950s. Sabin’s vaccine was seen as a safer alternative to the previous Salk polio vaccine. It was also easier to administer than the Salk version, which required an injection. Made by Glaxo Laboratories Limited.

Details

Category:
Public Health & Hygiene
Object Number:
1994-395
type:
vaccine
taxonomy:
  • drug
credit:
Glaxo Pharmaceuticals (UK) Ltd.