Pugh orthoptoscope, London, England, 1948-1968

Made:
1948-1968 in London
maker:
Theodore Hamblin Limited

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Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Pugh orthoptoscope by Hamblin, London, English, 1948-1968

An orthoptoscope – sometimes called an amblyoscope – is used to measure the angle of a squint in the eye and to determine how well both eyes work together – a squint is where the eyes are not parallel. The Pugh orthoptoscope was devised by Mary Agnes Pugh (1900-72), who drew on her experience working at the Squint Department at Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, from 1928 to 1948. As well as diagnosing squints, the Pugh orthoptoscope could also be used to treat them. This model was made by Theodore Hamblin Ltd, an optician and optical instrument maker.

Details

Category:
Ophthalmology
Collection:
Sir Henry Wellcome's Museum Collection
Object Number:
A626764
Materials:
brass, glass, plastic, rubber and steel
type:
orthoptoscope