Model demonstrating different types of eye sight, Europe, 1880-1900

Made:
1880-1900 in Europe
maker:
Unknown

Buy this image as a print 

Buy

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

License

Buy this image as a print 

Buy

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

License

Buy this image as a print 

Buy

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

License

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Eye defect teaching model, on wood stand, probably English, 1801-1900.

Showing how light enters the eye in long sight, normal sight and short sight; this is a 3-D model of the light diagrams seen in many science and medical textbooks. The model was probably used as a teaching aid for students studying the eye.

In normal sight, the light rays meet up at the retina, the sensitive part of the eye, and send a message to the brain through the optical nerve. Long sight (not being able to see close up) means that the light meets behind the retina; short sight (not being able to see far away) occurs when light meets up in front of the retina. Both conditions can be corrected with glasses. For a person with both long and short sight, bi-focal lenses can be used.

Details

Category:
Ophthalmology
Object Number:
A602310
Materials:
brass, glass and wood
type:
model
taxonomy:
  • visual and verbal communication
  • furnishing and equipment
  • tools & equipment
  • eyeglass
  • spectacles
credit:
The Wellcome Trust