Set of 'Artificial' Magnets, c. 1762

Made:
1762 in London
maker:
George Adams
Set of 'Artificial' Magnets, c. 1762 (magnets; demonstration equipment)

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Six bar magnets, in case with keepers.

Set of six artificial magnets, in case, 1762. 'Artificial magnets', introduced in 1750, were known as such to distinguish them from the natural magnetite lodestones which had been in use for several centuries. These bars were made by George Adams, instrument maker to King George III. They were used to show attraction and repulsion, demonstrate lines of force with iron filings, and pick up soft iron balls.

Details

Category:
King George III
Object Number:
1929-98
Materials:
steel, mahogany and paper (fibre product)
Measurements:
overall box: 35 mm x 316 mm x 156 mm, 3.66 kg
overall magnet (each): 20 mm x 269 mm x 11 mm,
type:
magnets and demonstration equipment
credit:
King's College, London