X-ray tube

Made:
1895-1899 in Germany

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Large pear shaped x-ray tube of form originally used by Prof. Röntgen, manufactured in Germany about 1896. Inside of glass at end of tube eroded by bringing cathode rays to a focus with a magnet; on stand.

Large pear shaped x-ray tube of form originally used by Prof. Rontgen, manufactured in Germany about 1896. Inside of glass at end of tube eroded by bringing cathode rays to a focus with a magnet; on stand.

X-rays were discovered in 1895 when Wilhem Röntgen, A German professor of physics, encountered unknown emissions from a Crookes discharge tube. Experiments revealed that these rays penetrated some substances more easily than others, and also fogged photographic plates. The fact that X-rays could produce images differentiating between the densities of body tissues, produced results which medical enthusiasts for 'the new light' were keen to exploit. X-rays were also used to treat tumours. This early German X-ray tube is of the form originally used by Röntgen in his research.

Details

Category:
X-rays
Object Number:
1923-350
type:
x-ray tube
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • tools & equipment
  • x-ray machine
credit:
Institution of Electrical Engineers