Original cavity magnetron, developed by John Randa

Made:
1940
maker:
Henry Boot
and
John Turton Randall
Original Cavity Magnetron Valve of Randall and Boot, presented by Professor J T Randall of The University, St. Andrews, Original Cavity Magnetron Valve of Randall and Boot, presented by Professor J T Randall of The University, St. Andrews, Original Cavity Magnetron Valve of Randall and Boot, presented by Professor J T Randall of The University, St. Andrews, Original Cavity Magnetron Valve of Randall and Boot, presented by Professor J T Randall of The University, St. Andrews, Original Cavity Magnetron Valve of Randall and Boot, presented by Professor J T Randall of The University, St. Andrews, Original Cavity Magnetron Valve of Randall and Boot, presented by Professor J T Randall of The University, St. Andrews, Magnetron Block as used in the original Magnetron Valve of Randall and Boot. From a colour transparency in the Science

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Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Original Cavity Magnetron Valve of Randall and Boot, presented by Professor J T Randall of The University, St. Andrews,
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Original Cavity Magnetron Valve of Randall and Boot, presented by Professor J T Randall of The University, St. Andrews,
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Original Cavity Magnetron Valve of Randall and Boot, presented by Professor J T Randall of The University, St. Andrews,
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Original Cavity Magnetron Valve of Randall and Boot, presented by Professor J T Randall of The University, St. Andrews,
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Original Cavity Magnetron Valve of Randall and Boot, presented by Professor J T Randall of The University, St. Andrews,
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Original Cavity Magnetron Valve of Randall and Boot, presented by Professor J T Randall of The University, St. Andrews,
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Magnetron Block as used in the original Magnetron Valve of Randall and Boot. From a colour transparency in the Science
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Original cavity magnetron, developed by John Randall and Henry Boot in 1940, with spare anode block.

This is the original magnetron, which made it possible to build radar sets small enough to fit into aircraft. The earliest radar was ground-based, employing massive 100 metre masts in the celebrated 'Chain Home' system, which helped win the Battle of Britain. But, to counter submarines and night bombers, radar had to be miniaturised to be carried on aircraft. John Randall and Harry Boot's cavity magnetron was the first practical device for producing the ultra-short radio waves at adequate power to enable the system to work. Magnetrons later formed the heart of microwave ovens.

Details

Category:
Radio Communication
Object Number:
1946-107
credit:
Professor Randall and Dr. Boot