Vinten Model H 35mm film cine camera

Made:
circa 1936 in London
maker:
W Vinten

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Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Vinten Model H 35mm intermediate film cinema believed to have been used in conjunction with Baird Television's system in Studio B at Alexandra Palace, London 1936.

A Vinten Model H 35mm film camera, England, c.1936, believed to have been used in John Logie Baird's television studio at Alexandra Palace.

In 1936 Baird used a system called the 'Intermediate Film Technique'. A modified film camera was used to shoot scenes in the studio. The film was fed through a hole in the bottom of the camera into tanks containing developer, fixer and then water. Whilst still underwater the developed film was then scanned by a special Nipkow disc to convert it into a television picture. The system was terribly unreliable and was dropped after 3 months.

Details

Category:
Television
Object Number:
1996-5050
Materials:
glass, mechanical components and metal (unknown)
Measurements:
overall: 460 mm x 260 mm x 740 mm, 15kg
type:
cine camera
taxonomy:
  • tools and equipment
  • equipment by process
  • image making equipment
  • camera (function)
credit:
The National Media Museum, Bradford