Ekman reversing waterbottle for measuring temperature of seawater samples

Made:
1910 in Oslo
maker:
Anderson, C L

Ekman reversing water bottle for measuring the temperature of seawater samples, small model with a messenger release system, designed by Vagn Walfrid Ekman and made by Ludvig Andersen, Kristiania (now Oslo), Norway, 1910. Two messengers plus cable.

These bottles were used for oceanographic research in the early years of the 1900s. They had two chambers with hinged lids and attached reversing thermometers, so that water temperature of two samples could be measured at different depths. They were also designed so that several bottles could be deployed on a line, with a system of messenger weights triggering the operation of bottles at different depths.

Details

Category:
Oceanography
Object Number:
1910-132
Materials:
copper (alloy) and metal (unknown)
type:
non-insulated water bottles
credit:
Andersen, L.

Parts

Ekman reversing waterbottle for measuring temperature of seawater samples

Ekman reversing waterbottle for measuring temperature of seawater samples

Ekman reversing water bottle with a messenger release system for measuring the temperature of seawater samples. Designed by Vagn Walfrid Ekman and made by Ludvig Andersen, Cristiania (or Kristiania, now Oslo), Norway, 1910.


These bottles were used for oceanographic research in the early years of the 1900s. They had two chambers with hinged lids and attached reversing thermometers, so that water temperature of two samples could be measured at different depths. They were also designed so that several bottles could be deployed on a line, with a system of messenger weights triggering the operation of bottles at different depths.

Materials:
copper (alloy)
Object Number:
1910-132/1
type:
bottles and oceanography
Messenger weight for Ekman reversing waterbottle

Messenger weight for Ekman reversing waterbottle

Brass component. From Ekman reversing water bottle with a messenger release system for measuring the temperature of seawater samples. Designed by Vagn Walfrid Ekman and made by Ludvig Andersen, Cristiania (or Kristiania, now Oslo), Norway, 1910.


These bottles were used for oceanographic research in the early years of the 1900s. They had two chambers with hinged lids and attached reversing thermometers, so that water temperature of two samples could be measured at different depths. They were also designed so that several bottles could be deployed on a line, with a system of messenger weights triggering the operation of bottles at different depths.

Materials:
copper (alloy)
Object Number:
1910-132/2
type:
component
Cable from messenger release system for Ekman reversing waterbottle

Cable from messenger release system for Ekman reversing waterbottle

Cables from the messenger resease system of Ekman reversing water bottle for measuring the temperature of seawater samples. Designed by Vagn Walfrid Ekman and made by Ludvig Andersen, Cristiania (or Kristiania, now Oslo), Norway, 1910.


These bottles were used for oceanographic research in the early years of the 1900s. They had two chambers with hinged lids and attached reversing thermometers, so that water temperature of two samples could be measured at different depths. They were also designed so that several bottles could be deployed on a line, with a system of messenger weights triggering the operation of bottles at different depths.

Materials:
copper (alloy) and metal (unknown)
Object Number:
1910-132/3
type:
cables