Electron diffraction camera, 1925.

Made:
1925 in Aberdeen
Electron diffraction photographs, 1929/ 1931. G P Thomson observed diffraction of electrons passing through thin gold

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Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Electron diffraction photographs, 1929/ 1931. G P Thomson observed diffraction of electrons passing through thin gold
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Original electron diffraction camera used by G P Thomson.

Made in Aberdeen by G P Thomson (1892-1975), the son of J J Thomson (1856-1940) who identified the electron. Working in the same field, G P Thomson observed diffraction of electrons passing through thin gold foil, recorded on photographic plates as concentric rings of varying intensity about the incident beam. This supported the idea of de Brogle that particles had wave-like properties. In 1937, G P Thomson received the Nobel Prize for this work, jointly with the American physicist C J Davisson (1881-1958) who also observed electron diffraction using nickel crystals.

Details

Category:
Nuclear Physics
Object Number:
1948-24
Materials:
glass, metal, metal (painted) and sealing wax
type:
electron diffraction cameras
credit:
Sir George Thomson