Schimmelbusch mask

Made:
1890-1935 in England
Schimmelbusch mask for open chloroform anaesthesia Schimmelbusch mask for open chloroform anaesthesia Schimmelbusch mask for open chloroform anaesthesia

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Schimmelbusch mask for open chloroform anaesthesia
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London

Schimmelbusch mask for open chloroform anaesthesia
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London

Schimmelbusch mask for open chloroform anaesthesia
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London

Schimmelbusch mask for open chloroform anaesthesia, possibly England, 1890-1935

This type of mask is named after its developer Curt Schimmelbusch (1860-1895), a German doctor and pathologist. Developed in 1890, it was originally design for use with ether, an anaesthetic agent. The

Chloroform was dropped from a dropping bottle, which has a graduated scale, onto the cotton material of the mask. It would then evaporate and the patient would breathe in the gas. The trough around the edge of the mask captured any liquid, stopping it from dropping on to the patient's face and causing skin irritation.

Details

Category:
Anaesthesiology
Collection:
Sir Henry Wellcome's Museum Collection
Object Number:
A600329
Materials:
frame, metal and cover, fabric, knitted
type:
anaesthetic mask
credit:
Loan, Wellcome Trust