Glass phial of 'Mepacrine' an anti-malaria treatment, England, 1957-1975

Made:
1957-1975 in Macclesfield
maker:
Imperial Chemical Industries Limited, Pharmaceuticals Division
Glass phial of 'Mepacrine', one of ten anti-malarial drug preparations from ICI.

Buy this image as a print 

Buy

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

License

Glass phial of 'Mepacrine', one of ten anti-malarial drug preparations from ICI.
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Glass phial of 'Mepacrine' (yellow powder), 0.36g methasuphate, one of ten anti-malarial drug preparations from ICI Ltd. (Pharmaceuticals Division), 1951-1975.

‘Mepacrine’ is a yellow powder made by ICI Ltd to prevent and treat malaria. The powder is mixed with a liquid and then injected into the body. The treatment was introduced in Germany 1933 and was produced in large quantities for Allied troops during the Second World War. Troops needed to take preventative measures against malaria when fighting in areas such as North Africa and the Middle East, where the disease is common. Unfortunately, when used for a long time, the treatment turns the skin yellow. Like other anti-malarial drugs, it was found that Mepacrine has anti-inflammatory properties and it is used today to treat skin disorders.

Details

Category:
Industrial Chemistry
Object Number:
1976-626/7
type:
phial
taxonomy:
  • drug
  • furnishing and equipment
  • container - receptacle
  • vessel
credit:
ICI Ltd. (Pharmaceuticals Division)