Haemoglobin model

Made:
1967
maker:
Max Ferdinand Perutz

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Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London.

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London.

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London.

Haemoglobin model, with four movable sections, built in 1967, by Max Perutz

This model of haemoglobin was built in 1967 by Max Perutz (1914-2002) at the Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge.

In 1937 Perutz began to use X-ray diffraction to uncover the biological function of haemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells responsible for transporting oxygen. It took nearly twenty years for him to painstakingly solve this complex structure.

This model was used in research to understand and compare the basic structure of the molecule to understand how it transported oxygen around the body.

Details

Category:
Biochemistry
Object Number:
2016-555
Materials:
acrylic, metal (unknown), paint, wood (unidentified)
type:
model - representation
taxonomy:
  • visual and verbal communication
credit:
Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge

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