Gravity Probe B gyroscope rotor and housing

Made:
1992-1995 in Palo Alto
maker:
Stanford University
Housing for Gravity Probe B experiment gyroscope rotor. Housing for gyroscope rotor from Gravity Probe B experiment. Gyroscope rotor from Gravity Probe B experiment.

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Buy this image as a print 

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License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

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Buy this image as a print 

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License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

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Buy this image as a print 

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License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

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Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Housing for Gravity Probe B experiment gyroscope rotor.
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Housing for gyroscope rotor from Gravity Probe B experiment.
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Gyroscope rotor from Gravity Probe B experiment.
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Gyroscope rotor and housing from Gravity Probe B experiment with case

The Gravity Probe B experiment was designed to test two predictions of general relativity: that a massive body such as the Earth should warp and twist the space-time around it. Four spheres like this one - among the most perfect ever made - were set spinning on a spacecraft precisely pointed towards a guide star. Scientists spent seven years analysing the mission data to see if the angles of the spheres' spins were altered by the warp and twist. The final experimental results were annouced in 2011 and confirmed Einstein's predictions.

Details

Category:
Space Technology
Object Number:
2005-75
type:
instrument component
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • tools & equipment
  • component - object
credit:
Stanford University