silicon wafer signed by Gordon Moore, 2005

Made:
2005 in United States

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Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Silicon wafer signed by Gordon Moore for the 40th anniversary of Moore’s Law, with Pentium 4 processors, made by the Intel Corporation, United States, 2005. Complete with case.

Silicon wafer signed by Gordon Moore for the 40th anniversary of Moore’s Law, with Pentium 4 processors, made by the Intel Corporation, United States, 2005.

This silicon chip is covered with Intel Pentium 4 microprocessors, and is signed by Gordon E Moore (b. 1929), one of the co-founders of microchip producer Intel. In an article published in 1965 Moore made a prediction that “the number of transistors incorporated in a chip will approximately double every 24 months." His prediction was broadly correct for the following 40 years, and this wafer was signed by Moore to mark the 40th anniversary of what had come to be known as Moore’s Law.

Details

Category:
Computing & Data Processing
Object Number:
2005-78
Materials:
plastic (unidentified) and silicon
type:
silicon wafer
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • tools & equipment
credit:
Donated by Intel Corporation