Gold amulet in the form of a cobra

Made:
2000-100 BCE in Egypt

Creative Commons LicenseThis image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Buy this image as a print 

Buy

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

License

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Thin gold amulet, cut and punched from behind into a cobra or uralus, Egyptian

Many people still believe that amulets have magical or spiritual powers, bringing good luck and good health while providing protection from sickness and harm. A female cobra with its hood raised in a uraeus pose is punched into this thin gold amulet, which is just over 10 mm in height. A uraeus was a symbol of authority used by ancient Egyptian kings and queens. The cobra was said to spit poison into the eyes of an enemy. The amulet would have been worn around the neck.

Details

Category:
Classical & Medieval Medicine
Collection:
Sir Henry Wellcome's Museum Collection
Object Number:
A76748
Measurements:
overall (laying flat): 1 mm x 8 mm x 12 mm, .001 kg
type:
amulet
taxonomy:
credit:
Loan, Wellcome Trust