Glass cup, Roman, 251-450 CE

Made:
251-450 CE in Roman Empire
maker:
Unknown

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Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Glass cupping or drinking vessel, Roman, 251-450AD

Cupping is the practice of placing heated cups or vessels like this on the body to draw out any impurities and bring blood to the surface of the skin. This is known as dry cupping. Wet cupping is when the welts left on the body are cut to let blood flow out. It was believed that this would re-balance the humours and restore a person to health. There is also a possibility that this glass was used for drinking, although it may have been used for both purposes.

Details

Category:
Classical & Medieval Medicine
Object Number:
A100738
type:
cupping vessel
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • tools & equipment
  • medical instrument
credit:
Sotheby's