Display size matrices for Times New Roman (Typeface series number: 327)

maker:
The Monotype Corporation Limited
Display size matrices for Times New Roman (Typeface series number: 327) Display size matrices for Times New Roman (Typeface series number: 327) Display size matrices for Times New Roman (Typeface series number: 327) Display size matrices for Times New Roman (Typeface series number: 327)

Display size matrices for Times New Roman (Typeface series number: 327)

Display size matrices for Times New Roman (Typeface series number: 327)

Display size matrices for Times New Roman (Typeface series number: 327)

Display size matrices for Times New Roman (Typeface series number: 327)

Display (1.0") size matrices for Times New Roman (Typeface Series number: 327), 72. In original wooden box no. 2543, manufactured by Monotype Corporation. Part of Monotype Loan Library collection.

As well as manufacturing machines that composed and cast type, The Monotype Corporation manufactured matrices for hundreds of different designs of typefaces in metal. From a set of matrices the owner of a Monotype machine could cast as much fresh type as they needed. Monotype built up a remarkable collection of typefaces for hot-metal technology, starting in 1900 and adding to it until the early 1980s. Each Monotype typeface was allocated a series number and a name. Type came in points (pt) and continental standard Didot (D) sizes from as small as 4 ¼ pt and as large as 72pt or 72D. Type that was 14pt and larger was known as display size because of its suitability for setting as headings and titles as opposed to continuous text.

Times New Roman was created by the esteemed typographer Stanley Morison, designer Victor Lardent and The Monotype Corporation. Morison had been challenged to produce a typeface for The Times newspaper that was economical with space and yet still highly legibility on newsprint pages. The first issue of the newspaper to use Times New Roman was 3 October 1932. The typeface was released commercially in 1933 and the Times New Roman family became one of the most widely used typefaces for books, journals and jobbing printing.

The typeface is narrow in relation to its large x-height. Its strong colour is given a crisp appearance by the sharply cut small serifs and subtle shading. Both Times New Roman and its companion bold combine vertical and diagonal stress. Capitals are vertically stressed, while the lowercase stress is mainly diagonal. The thickest parts of c and e are very low down. Counters are kept clean and open, and characteristic letterforms remain strong and legible even in the smallest sizes. The g has a wide tail. The capitals, being no higher than the short ascenders, are small and unobtrusive. The italic has a moderate inclination and has the serifs of the roman.

The Monotype Corporation made 24 series for the Times family in metal type including: a wide version, a semi-bold, an extended titling, four Greek series, a special version for small newspaper ads and a modified version with longer descenders for book work. The typeface had a full range of Cyrillic characters and what was at the time the largest range of accented characters for languages using the Latin alphabet.

Times New Roman was quickly licensed and produced by Linotype, Monotype’s main rival in mechanical typesetting systems. Years later other typesetting system manufacturers, and traditional typefounders Stephenson Blake, offered the typeface too. Times New Roman comes pre-installed as a core font with Windows and Mac computers and was the default font in English-language versions of Microsoft Word for many years. In 2004 the US State Department started using it on most of its documents. It is still available on personal computers for use by millions of people around the world. Times New Roman has had the greatest impact of any twentieth-century roman typeface.

Details

Category:
Printing & Writing
Collection:
Monotype Corporation Collection
Object Number:
1995-1111/1215
Materials:
metal (unknown), steel (metal) and wood (unidentified)
type:
matrix