Barometer, Kew Pattern, for use at Meteorological Stations

Made:
1914
SMG00045353

Buy this image as a print 

Buy

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

License

SMG00045353
Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Mercury fixed-cistern barometer, serial no. 1382 with Meteorological Office mark, for use in meteorological stations, Kew pattern, made by S. & A. Calderara, Springfield Gardens, Clapton, London, England, UK, 1914. The barometer scale is marked in centibars and has a vernier for precision readings. A mercury thermometer, marked in kelvins, is mounted on the outside of the case.

Kew pattern barometers are so-called because they were originally developed under the superintendence of the Kew Committee, a committee of the British Association for the Advancement of Science. The committee met at Kew Observatory, which from the early 1900s was administered by the Meteorological Office. Beginning with an initiative in the 1850s to develop a barometer for making accurate readings at sea, the Kew pattern barometers became standard instruments, widely deployed around the world in the 1800s and 1900s. A marine version is designed for use on board ships, whereas this model is for use at land-based meteorological stations.

Details

Category:
Meteorology
Object Number:
1914-312/1
Materials:
brass (copper, zinc alloy), glass and mercury
type:
barometer
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • measuring device - instrument
credit:
Meteorological Office