Endoscope with attachments

Made:
1875-1885 in England
maker:
Unknown
Endoscope (for aural, rectal or urethral use), in case.
      Full view, instruments alongside case. Grey background.

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Endoscope (for aural, rectal or urethral use), in case. Full view, instruments alongside case. Grey background.
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Endoscope (for aural, rectal or urethral use) with three short and two long specula and lamp, in leather covered wooden case

A physician uses an endoscope to look into body cavities. This is to examine a patient and diagnose disease. Specialised endoscopes have different designs and names according to what part of the body they look at, for example the throat, rectum or bladder.

This endoscope comes with attachments, called specula. These are for aural, rectal or urethral use. An endoscope uses a light source, in this case a lighted wick, to illuminate the cavity via reflective surfaces. The light bounces off an angled mirror inside the endoscope. This projects the light and enables the physician to see into the body.

In 1865, British physician John Brunton (1835–1899) described using a modified endoscope or ‘auriscope’ to examine the ear. This instrument is a development of Brunton’s auriscope (see A647320).

Details

Category:
Clinical Diagnosis
Object Number:
A600267
Materials:
brass (copper, zinc alloy), complete, leather, metal (silvered) and velvet
Measurements:
overall - endoscope: 68 mm x 320 mm x 111 mm, .26 kg
overall - case closed: 88 mm x 213 mm x 128 mm, .506 kg
overall case open: 170 mm x 213 mm x 175 mm,
overall - nozzle: 51 mm 22 mm, .01 kg
type:
endoscope
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • tools & equipment
  • medical instrument
credit:
Boulange