Bubby pot for infant feeding, England, 1770-1835

Made:
1770-1835 in Staffordshire
maker:
Josiah Wedgwood and Sons Limited

Buy this image as a print 

Buy

License this image for commercial use at Science and Society Picture Library

License

Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Bubby pot for infant feeding, possibly by Wedgwood, English, 1770-1835

This tiny teapot was used for feeding infants. It was made by famous Staffordshire pottery firm, Wedgwood. Before dried and condensed milk were introduced in the 1860s, mothers or wet nurses used a combination of breastfeeding and other foods to feed their babies. The latter included a liquefied mixture of bread, flour, milk and sugar. This teapot was known as a ‘Bubby pot’. It was filled with liquid food. The child sucked upon the perforated spout like they would on a baby’s bottle today. The spout was often covered in cloth.

Details

Category:
Nursing & Hospital Furnishings
Collection:
Sir Henry Wellcome's Museum Collection
Object Number:
A600084
Materials:
ceramic (unspecified) and complete
Measurements:
overall (lid): 24 mm 49 mm, .018 kg
overall - including lid: 120 mm x 140 mm 70 mm, .156 kg
type:
bubby pot
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • tools & equipment
  • infant feeder