Standard Five-inch Rain Gauge

Made:
1940-1950
Rain gauge, 5 inch, British Association, with can, collector and funnel.

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Rain gauge, 5 inch, British Association, with can, collector and funnel.
Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Rain gauge with five-inch diameter, of the type adopted in the 1860s by the British Rainfall Organisation and later the Meteorological Office, made in Britain, 1900s. The gauge consists of a copper funnel, an outer can and an internal collector. The rim is one foot off the ground to prevent in-splashing.

Regular monitoring of rainfall in Britain was stimulated by a run of unusually dry years in the 1850s. Meteorologist George James Symons was instrumental in establishing a network of hundreds of observers who reported their observations back to him for publication, in a initiative partly funded by the British Association for the Advancement of Science. Symons conducted tests of different rain gauge designs, and recommended this five-inch-diameter design as the standard device. Gauges of this type were also adopted by the Meteorological Office.

Details

Category:
Meteorology
Object Number:
1997-1370
type:
rain-gauge
taxonomy:
  • furnishing and equipment
  • measuring device - instrument
  • precipitation gauge
credit:
Meteorological Office