Marine chronometer by E. Barthet, found on an abandoned ship

Made:
1840 in Marseilles

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Science Museum Group / The Clockmakers' Museum
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London

Science Museum Group / The Clockmakers' Museum
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London

Science Museum Group /The Clockmakers' Museum
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London

Marine chronometer by E. Barthet, Marseilles, France c.1840. Gimballed wooden box, with carry handle and sliding inspection hatch to top. Movement contained in a removable cannister. Silvered dial with central minute hand and subsidiary dials for hours and seconds; also a thermometer. Signed 'E Barthet A Marseille No 10' and 'Reaumur' under the thermometer; a reference to the Réaumur temperature scale. Fusee movement with double links to the fusee chain. Spring detent escapement with endwise adjustment. Two arm compensation balance, with spherical shaped balance spring. 30 hour duration.

This chronometer is of very high quality and workmanship, and was picked up at sea from an abandoned ship by Sir William Walker in 1846, whilst in command of the ship 'Monarch'. It was later bought by Messrs Brockbanks & Atkins for £15 and presented to the museum of the Worshipful Company of Clockmakers by Samuel Elliot Atkins in 1875. Clockmakers' Museum No. 620

Details

Category:
Clockmakers
Collection:
The Worshipful Company of Clockmakers
Object Number:
L2015-3496
Materials:
brass (copper, zinc alloy), glass, lead (metal), mahogany (wood), silvered brass and steel (metal)
Measurements:
overall: 148 mm x 160 mm x 165 mm,
type:
marine chronometer
credit:
Lent by the Worshipful Company of Clockmakers